Archives for posts with tag: Recognition

Today Apple is introducing a new collection in the Education section of the App Store entitled “Real-World Learning.” We’re honored that our Art Authority K-12 for iPad app is one of the five titles they’re featuring. For each app in the collection, Apple has created a free set of lesson plans tailored towards real-world learning with that app. In our case, their multimedia iBook “Art Authority Lesson Ideas” provides specialized plans for ages 5-12, 12-14 and 14-18. And the lessons are not just about art. Art Authority is used as the jumping off point for lessons about Literacy, Social Studies, and History too.

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The plans include both app-based and real-world activities, such as museum visits, poem writing, and drawing. One activity is specifically based on Picasso’s The Old Guitarist, and another is about the impact of the Byzantine Empire. Objectives, overviews and even rubrics are provided for each activity, along with the activity details.

Apple feels that the benefits of the plans include:

  • Enriching the classroom with works of world-famous artists
  • Enabling comparison of works within the app, and to real life
  • Engaging students and building anticipation by exploring artists before visiting real art museums
  • Inspiring work in other subjects.

This is not the first time that Apple has featured our app in a high visibility education event. It was also called out by Phil Schiller as one of seven “amazing” iPad educational apps in a Special Educational Event at the Guggenheim Museum, and has been featured in a number of Apple’s Back to School programs.

We love it that Apple loves our app. As Apple continues changing the world in incredibly meaningful ways, it’s nice to know that we’re helping out too.

Today is the 20th anniversary of the founding of Open Door Networks, the parent company of Art Authority. We are very proud of our 20 years creating great app(lication)s for Apple devices.

Open Door Networks is an Internet company, and always has been. As such we have had to grow and change with the Net, as well as with Apple (the company that gave our founder his start and us our focus). It has been an interesting evolution:

  • We started as a Macintosh dial-up Internet Service Provider, then helped our home town of Ashland Oregon build and run the ahead-of-its-time Ashland Fiber Network.
  • We have been a server application provider, helping the Apple community out with utilities for many early Mac-based Web and other servers.
  • We have been a Macintosh-based web hosting service.
  • We have been a developer of Internet security software, for Apple, Symantec and ourselves.
  • We have created over 100 iPhone and iPad apps, including day-one apps for both devices.
  • We are now the developer of the number one classic art app out there.

Quite the ride! What’s next?

As you may have heard, Art Authority was featured in an article on “Applied Reading” in the New York Times Book Review last Sunday. The article begins by pointing out how “electronic textbooks” are “more effective” as learning tools than traditional paper-based solutions:

“Who wants merely… to squint at a tiny printed reproduction of a still life by Pieter Claesz — an artist who was sharing pictures of food centuries before Instagram was invented — instead of popping open a full-screen version to better study the composition?”

The article serves as a perfect example of its own point. In the print (“treeware”) version of the Times, the article includes, quite literally, “a tiny printed reproduction of a still life by Pieter Claesz” (as shown in Art Authority for iPad).

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There is a fundamental defect in the printed version of the paper however, which prevents you from “popping open a full-screen version to better study the composition.” You can however do this in the online version of the article (and as part of this post as well). And of course you do it even better in the app itself.

The fact that an electronic version of a Book Review article is fundamentally better than a print version of the same article is certainly a sign of the Times. As we think is Art Authority. Thank you New York Times for making your (and our) point so well!

 

 

The home pages of the various App Stores (iTunes on Mac/PC, iPad, iPhone) currently have a big rotating banner proclaiming Celebrate the Arts with a subhead of “Fine Art, Music & Literature”. If you click/tap on this banner, you are presented front and center (literally in some cases) with our Art Authority app, among others.

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Apple’s campaign, and their highlighting of Art Authority is cool for lots of different reasons. Perhaps the main one is some of the other apps we’re included with (and in many cases ahead of): official apps from likes of the Louvre, MoMA and the Tate, Roy Lichtenstein and Andy Warhol. And a cool looking new art-event-each-day app from the Kennedy Center called Arts Days.

Not to mention Jimi Hendrix, Sting and even Rolling Stone’s “The Beatles”! We’re there with the rock stars! Definitely worth celebrating.

Our previously announced intership program is now rolling along, with dozens of interns learning the ropes in the burgeoning digital art field while at the same time helping us to enhance our digitalized art collection. They’re also helping us implement the first stages of our recently announced partnership with Bridgeman Art Library, which involves merging the two collection databases together in preparation for adding print-on-demand capabilities to Art Authority for iPad.

Relatedly, Art Authority was just featured at the Art Career Project in an article entitled “15 Art Apps You Should Be Using.” We definitely appreciate the publicity and accolades (“one of the most beautifully designed apps on iTunes”), but we even more appreciate the recognition that we’re on the right track with our education initiatives:

  • The Art Career Project Web site says “We are a group of people – much like you – who are passionate about art.” Check.
  • It also says “a career in art often starts with an excellent education.” Check.
  • And “We’re looking to educate you on how to educate yourself in preparation for an exciting career in art!” Check!

So thanks, Art Career Project, for doing what you do and for helping us validate that what we’re doing can really be important.

 

Art Authority has always been very popular in Japan. The new Art Authority for the new iPad has certainly been no exception. Not only has it been the top-selling reference app for the past week, but it recently moved to the number 35 best-selling app overall. #35 may not sound like much, but out of 200,000 iPad apps, it’s pretty meaningful. For instance, as you can see below, that’s 10 better than Angry Birds Seasons (and at nearly three times the price).

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They just love Art Authority in Japan! Not to toot our own horn too much, but here’s a recent review:

このアプリは素晴らしいです – ★★★★★

この金額でこれだけの作品をみれるなんて素晴らしすぎます。 もっと値段が高くても良いのではないでしょうか? 唯一欠点としては、一人の画家の作品が多すぎて、見たい作品を探すのが大変なぐらいです。

For those of us who don’t read Japanese, the operative word is

素晴らしい which means “amazing” or “awesome:) The review’s only complaint: too many works of art!

One of the driving factors behind our continued development and improvement of Art Authority is the passion we have for making a difference in education.  When Apple announced it would be holding a press event with an educational theme, we eagerly awaited to see what Apple and the late Steve Jobs had created to “disrupt the textbook.”  

One of the quotes from the event we really identified with:

There’s a lot that is talked about that may be wrong with education. One thing we hear louder than all else, and where we can help, is in student engagement.

Apple announced iBooks 2, iBooks Author, and some major advancements for iTunesU. You can watch the full video of the event here

And to our surprise and delight, Art Authority was highlighted by senior VP Phil Schiller on stage as one of seven “amazing” iPad educational apps.      

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Speaking of the intersection between education, liberal arts, and technology, we are gearing up to make some of our own announcements here at the Moscone Center for MacWorld/iWorld 2012. Stay tuned.  

From a pool of over 6,500 iPad reference apps, Art Authority was selected as Best iPad Reference App of 2011 in the United States by the App Store editorial team.   

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Art Authority was conceived and developed through the We-Envision collaboration, a partnership between two Southern Oregon software companies, Open Door Networks and Project A.